Youth Minister Chris Wesley’s 4 Key Things for a Technology-Driven Ministry

By John Dere, Crossmap On September 30, 2013

Chris Wesley, Director of Student Ministry at the Roman Catholic Parish Church of the Nativity in Timonium, Maryland, recently opened up about his thoughts on how technology should be used in Christian ministry.

“As I grow to understand the fast and limitless world of technology, I realize it’s important to have boundaries and a purpose behind how I use it,” he wrote. “I’m always learning new things.”

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Here is a shortened version of Wesley’s list, in which he gives four technological tips for church leaders to consider:

1) Lean In:

“Do not fear [technology’s] overwhelming nature,” he wrote. “You need to get out there and play around with it. Spend time observing how others use it, take tutorials and ask avid users why they use what they use. The more you put yourself in the world of technology, the more you’ll understand how to utilize pieces of it.”

2) Get Ahead of the Curve:

“Do not be afraid to experiment with technology in your ministry,” he added. “If you can create a trend, you have the capability of changing its landscape. YouVersion Bible has a great story about getting ahead of the curve during the launch of apps when smart phones were first released. Do not be afraid to think outside the box when it comes to using technology.”

3) Educate Them:

“If you are going to utilize technology, make sure you are helping teens learn about its consequences,” Wesley continued. “Technology is just like money, where it’s a tool that can be used for good and bad. Bring in speakers who can talk about safely using it. Use it as an example in your messages about margin, idols or relationships. Make sure they are not just taking it for granted.”

4) Bring Along Parents:

“It’s important to empower parents when it comes to technology,” he added. “Their teens are going to be using it before some of them even know it exists. Keep parents informed through emails, newsletters or workshops. By keeping parents educated, they’ll trust that you are looking out for them.”

You can check out Chris Wesley’s full article and his personal website as well.