Blood Moon Tetrad April 15, 2014: When and Where to Watch [Live Stream Online] Mars Offering 'Bonus' Spectacle Alongside Fiery Lunar Eclipse

By Daniella Chen, Crossmap On April 11, 2014

Hanzlers Warped Visions / Flickr

Blood Moon is rising on April 15, 2014 to herald the rare astronomical event named a "tetrad," and, if it doesn't coincide with the end of the world, you can watch the blood red lunar eclipse through a live stream online.

This coming Tuesday, the eclipse will begin at 1:58 a.m. (EDT) as the moon moves into the shadow of the Earth. Totality will start at 3:07 a.m. (EDT) and last for 78 minutes, according to National Geographic.

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For those who are not in North America or are out of luck with a cloudy sky, the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles will provide live stream of the Blood Moon next Tuesday.

A webcast from SLOOH Observatory in the Canary Islands off of North Africa will also track the orange red moon , accompanied by live feeds and expert commentary by hosts Bob Berman, Paul Cox, and the Slooh broadcast team.

NASA will also offer a live web chat to answer questions about the lunar eclipse starting at 1 a.m. (EDT)

READ: Blood Moon Tetrad Kicks Off April 15, 2014: Series of Lunar Eclipse Point to Apocalyptic Bible Prophecy?

The entire North and South American continents and much of the Pacific Basin, including Hawaii, will get the best views according to National Geographic. The second half of the eclipse will be visible to Eastern Australia.

Unfortunately, Europe, Africa, and central Asia, where the event takes place in daytime, will have to rely on the live stream.

The blood moon is the result of the sun's rays reflecting off the Earth's atmosphere, and its color is decided by temperature, humidity, and the amount of dust particles in the atmosphere.

The upcoming lunar eclipse with the sunset hue marks the first in a series of four blood moons, which will take place around every six months: April 15, 2014; October 8, 2014; April 4, 2015, and September 28, 2015. Each interval will include six full moons.

"The last such series happened in the years 2003 and 2004. It will only occur seven more times in the current century," says Space.com.

The first blood moon on April 15 will come with a bonus spectacle of Mars, also brightly shining in orange, which will be a few days past its closest approach to our planet.

Mars will appear "as a fiery red 'star' next to the moon. Together red Mars and the red shadow on the moon's face should be a spectacular sight and an incredible photo opportunity," Deborah Byrd said on EarthSky.